The Corporate Wellness Blog

Prior to globalization, any given company’s employee benefits were fairly straightforward. Employees hired were rewarded with an amount of vacation, medical leave, retirement planning and health insurance that reflected their seniority, specific location or country. As globalization has proliferated and thousands of companies now conduct business across borders, , corporate benefits packages have diversified. As human resources departments scramble to keep up with a company’s geographic expansion, the benefits that employees take for granted can vary wildly from firm to firm.

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Two centuries ago, American statesman Thomas Jefferson summed up his thoughts on exercise as: “A strong body makes the mind strong.” While the third U.S. president’s sentiment may still hold water in some ways, modern science may argue that the opposite is true. Studies have shown that lasting and long-term health starts between our ears and moves throughout the body from there. Particularly within the confines of an office, where external stressors like deadlines, profit margins and employee evaluations bombard the working individual, it has proven crucial to cultivate mental fortitude.

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When Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote that “Life is a journey, not a destination,” one assumes he meant it in a philosophical sense. Emerson was likely indicating that happiness and contentment are not tied to life’s many benchmarks, but instead are found in the appreciation of life’s day-to-day pleasures. However, when it comes to the many benefits of walking – whether it’s a work commute, a walk-and-talk meeting with a colleague or a way to avoid splurging on an Uber after an evening work event – that famous quote can also be interpreted literally.

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For many companies, health care spending is an expensive fact of life, and for most, these costs rank second only to wages. In 2008, Price Waterhouse Cooper found that more than half of the $2.2 trillion spent on health care in the United States, or $1.2 trillion, was considered “wasteful spending.” This category includes unnecessary tests, procedures and prescriptions as well as money spent treating preventable conditions like obesity, musculoskeletal conditions and some mental health conditions.

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You can’t refresh your LinkedIn feed without seeing yet another listicle claiming to be the final and definitive list of the best places to work. Whether they’re breaking it down by country or on a global scale, it seems every media outlet wants to give you 10, 15, 25, or 100 of the best places to work, ranked for your convenience. At best, it’s an oversimplification; at worst, a popularity contest.

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